Bowing question for Chicken Reel

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  • #6477
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Hi John,

    I wasn’t sure where to post this question, because it’s about a youtube video you made a while back.

    I’ve been working on Chicken Reel for the longest time, trying to get it up to speed. I think my bowing may be inefficient and kind of hindering my speed potential. I can’t really tell on your video how you are bowing it, what notes you are slurring, if are there long and short bow strokes (like in Cajun Fiddle).

    So in the first part that goes F#-B-F#-A-F#-B-F#-A, are you giving each note it’s own quick bow stroke and changing direction for the next note? Or are you playing 2 or 3 or more notes on the same stroke?
    Same goes for the D-F#-D-E-D-F#-D-E part.

    Any other tips for speeding this up would be much appreciated!

    #6478
    John (BGD)John (BGD)
    Keymaster

    Hi Joe, that’s a great question. I’ll try to explain it here now, then post a video on it later.

    There are two ways to really speed up the Chicken Reel.

    1) Make sure your bow is going the correct direction.

    When you play

    F#-B-F#-A-F#-B-F#-A

    Where F# is on the D string and B & A are on the A string, make sure that your work it out by playing each F# on a down bow and each B & A on an up bow. There is an open D before the first F#, and I work this out by slurring that D-F# on the same down bow so that my first F# begins on the down bow.

    2) Economize the angle of your bow when you change strings.

    The F# is on the D string and the A & B are on the A string. As you rock back and forth between strings, you must change the angle of your bow, and that takes time. The secret to saving time is to never actually leave the D string. When you play the F# note, play only the D string. But when you play the A and the B notes on the A string, keep your second finger on the F# and continue to play the D string. So the F# is played by itself, but the B and A are each played with an F# underneath — two strings at once. This, way, you only have to tilt your bow at a very small angle to “catch” the A string without actually lifting off of the D string.

    down F#
    up F#/B
    down F#
    up F#/A
    down F#
    up F#/B
    down F#
    up A

    Similarly, when you play

    D-F#-D-E-D-F#-D-

    Where the D is on the A string and the F# & E are on the E string, you need to play each D with a down bow and each F# and E with an up bow. There is an open A before the first D, and I work this out by slurring that A-D on the same down bow so that my first D begins on the down bow.

    down D
    up D/F#
    down D
    up D/E
    down D
    up D/F#
    down D

    #6479
    AvatarAnonymous
    Inactive

    Wow thanks for the great response, I’ll try this out!

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