Double Fiddle harmonizing

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  • #89013
    Nsam19
    Participant

    Hi,

    Recently I began playing alongside another fiddler, so instead of playing the same thing on both.  Would anyone know of some good harmonizing techniques.  My friend mentioned about playing 2 notes below the original or using the end of the double stop notes.  So if someone has some good harmonizing techniques for playing twin fiddles could you please let me know?

    Thank you!

    #89017
    Frederick
    Participant

    I have made a point to learn the notes in each scale and chord. For example: if I am playing along in the key of G, I know the scale has G A B C D E F# and G. I know that the G chord has the notes G B and D; the C chord has C E and G; and the D chord has D F# and A.

    If the melody line has a G note and the chord is a G chord I know I can play a B or a D note and be consonant with the melody note. Same with a C chord where an E or a G would harmonize with the C note. etc.

    There are also common tones that are used in harmony. For example the G chord has a G in it as does the C chord. Holding a G note during both of these chords creates consonance. The G note could also be held during an E Minor chord or an A7 chord.

    Working with scales and chords is a wonderful way to learn harmonies. 🙂

    #89018
    Nsam19
    Participant

    Thank you very much.  This is very helpful.

    I know quite a few different scales and chords for each key.  So would it mean that the for a particular melody note, that I could harmonize by playing one of the other notes in the cord like – D I could harmonize with A?

    #89019
    Frederick
    Participant

    Yes, you could use an A note to harmonize in the D chord (D F# A).

    If you’re in the key of D here’s some more helpful info:

    The D scale has two sharps (F# and C#) The F# is called the “color tone” and the C# is called the “leading tone”. The color tone “colors” a chord either to be a major chord or as a minor chord. To make a Major D chord (D F# A) a Minor chord, simply use an F natural coloring the chord in a Minor “mood” (D F A).  D Minor is the relative minor of the F Major chord. The F scale is: F G A Bb C D E F. Notice the “Color Tone” in F Major is “A” and the “Leading Tone” is “E”.

    Here are some major chords with their minors:

    GBD, CEG, DF#A relative minor EGB, ACE, BD#F#A

    DF#A, GBD, AC#E relative minor BF#D, EGB, F#A#C#E

    CEG, FAC, GBD, relative minor ACE, DFA, EG#BD

    AC#E, DF#A, EG#B relative minor F#AC#, BF#D, C#E#G#B

    etc.

    #89020
    Nsam19
    Participant

    Thank you very much!  This is very helpful.  I appreciate it

    #89021
    Frederick
    Participant

    You bet. Just let us know if you have any questions. Someone here on the forum will be able to answer, I’m sure.

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