Double Stops

This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by cricket cricket 2 months ago.

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  • #73980
    Jerome Linyear
    Jerome Linyear
    Participant

    Hello again everybody! So I am trying to learn everyone’s favorite first tune Boil Em Cabbage Down and I just cant seem to be able to transition between double stops. Does anyone have a specific way that I can practice double stops that I can incorporate into my normal two hour practice routine?

    #73985
    Frederick
    Frederick
    Participant

    In the key of A try this:

    The first double stop will be a C# on the 2nd string paired with the open E 1st string (this is part of an A chord).

    From this chord, quickly transition to a D chord formed in this manner:

    Play the D note on the 2nd string (with the ring finger of your left hand) and on the 1st string, play the F# note with your index finger.

    Now, return back to the first chord you played (the A chord). From there it’s time to transition to the E chord.

    The E chord can be played by stopping the 2nd string with your index finger on the B note and pairing that with the open 1st string, E.

    That’s about the most basic double stops I can think of that might help you to practice changing from chord to chord and also when you’re ready, to “shuffle” between the chords.

    #73986
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Are you talking about double stops, as in holding down two strings at the same time, or drones, as in bowing two strings at the same time where you hold one down and let the other just sound as it is tuned?

    #73989
    Frederick
    Frederick
    Participant

    Cricket, I’m referring to my old college days and how I was taught to score for orchestra. lol. I’m using the actual definition of double stop indicating that when a string is played, it is stopped whether open or fingered:

    Two notes played simultaneously on a violin etc. using two separate strings. This term is applied not only if both strings are stopped by the finger, but also if one or both of the strings is open.

    #73991
    Avatar
    Angela
    Participant

    The hardest DS in the beginning BILE EM is the D chord with 3 on the a string and 1 on the e string. So my recommendation is to just practice that for awhile.

    3 on the a string is a d note so when it is in tune it should match the d string just an octave higher.  So practice that d note getting it in tune.  Then while your 3rd finger is down on the a add your first finger on e listening for it to be in tune. Do that until your hand starts to feel right and automatically find it and your ear starts to hear it.

    #73993
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Fred, I did realize you were talking about actual double stops…although I’m not sure I understood a word of it…lol…but I meant to ask the original poster, Jerome, and for sure I should have specified that…but the reason I asked is because I’ve seen lots of newer fiddlers call drones “double stops,” and since he says he’s working on BTCD, I figured he might have been talking drones.  I agree with Angela the double stop people normally get going in BTCD is that D “chord,’ (I realize it ain’t a chord if it’s only two notes, but for conversational easiness, ya know…I just say it that way), but you can even skip that and drone if you like.  Does sound better once you get the D double stop going, though.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by cricket cricket.
    #73998
    Avatar
    Eddie
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>I came to the thread based on the title. I have been practicing a climbing in 6ths etude that has been kicking my rear….</p>
    i need all the help I can get on double stops.

    #74004
    Frederick
    Frederick
    Participant

    I’m from the school that practices this: Two-note chords are called diads; three-note chords are called triads. A chord may contain any number of notes. The idea that somehow two notes sounded together do not make a chord is foreign to my instruction in music college.

    A double stop is a diad. :)

    #74009
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Good…then I’ll just call double stops chords.  That’s what they are, to me.  But I’ve said it before and people tend to jump out and start saying chords have to have at least three notes, etc., etc., etc., and then I tend to lose focus on what I was getting at when I called double stops chords in the first place…so…yeah, to me they are chords.  Anyhow, I didn’t know if the original post was referring to actually putting two fingers down and bowing, or just one finger and bowing the drone string too…I’ve seen people call both double stops and just wondering.  I always wonder as I wander…lol.

    #74011
    Jerome Linyear
    Jerome Linyear
    Participant

    Thank you both! I have never really done anything with music that in depth before so I am not familiar with all of the terminology. I’m just having trouble transitioning between the double stops that he mentions in the video. Because when I focus too much on the stops, my bowing suffers. Plus I think I might have the habit of putting too much pressure on the strings when I focus really hard on something which creates that terrible scratch that we all know and love.

    #74012
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Jerome…I think this is the regular stuff that happens to all fiddlers when they are just getting started.  Too much to think about all at once…keep going…one day it’ll all come together!

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