My practice routine (need input)

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by Jerome Linyear Jerome Linyear 1 week ago.

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  • #74096
    Jerome Linyear
    Jerome Linyear
    Participant

    Hey yall!

    So I have thought long and hard about how I am going to attack my practice methods. For the first 6 months give or take, I intend to commit at least two hours a day to my craft. Here is how I plan to divide those hours

    20 minutes – Bowing practice

    25 Minutes- Scales Practice

    5 minute- break

    30 minutes- vibrato practice

    40 minutes- Tunes

    What do yall think?

    #74098
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Sounds like a good workout…lol.  It should work for you if you’ve got the time for it. I think you’ll see some good results within six months of that routine.  One thing…I’m curious as to what type music you wanna play on your fiddle.

    #74099
    Jerome Linyear
    Jerome Linyear
    Participant

    I would like to play Western (Cowboy Style) music and Bluegrass. So kind of like the Texas Playboys or Gene Elders (George Strait’s Fiddler) or Hank Singer (session fiddler seen on Country Road TV on YouTube). So I primarily want to learn how to play back up fiddle. Meaning that I want to get to the point when one of my friends starts playing a song on the guitar or piano and I can add harmony and medley to it on my fiddle just by knowing the key. If you listen to any George Strait song (Blue Water for example) and you hear those beautiful fiddle lines in the background that fit into the time slots that he stops singing for a split second, that what I want to learn how to do. So basically, learn how to improvise.

    #74100
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Well it sounds like your practice routine would be on the right track.  Let us all know how it goes!

    #74108
    Gunnar Salyer
    Gunnar Salyer
    Participant

    Looks good, if you have enough discipline to stick to it! I doubt I could manage 20 minutes of anything Besides tunes😂😂🙄

    #74112
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    I’m the same as Gunnar on this…I’m usually bored with scales or anything besides actually working on the tune itself, not to mention it’s rare I even get 20 minutes for playing these days…but I think the kinda stuff he wants to play, the scales would be very helpful for familiarizing with keys and double stops and all of that.  6 months of that would really be helpful.

    #74113
    Avatar
    Joe
    Participant

    Lots of work in that practise routine. Dont get bogged down in something, though have some fun while you are learning. You may want to add jamming with others, that will help more than you realize.

    #74116
    Frederick
    Frederick
    Participant

    How to become really good in the shortest amount of time with lots of effort and struggle:

    I would start out with:

    • A perfectly tuned violin
    • 5 minutes bowing practice
    • 10 minutes scales (two octaves ascending and descending, using 2nd and third positions where necessary)
    • 10 minutes finger exercises in 1st position
    • 5 minutes transitioning from 1st to 2nd, 1st to 3rd, and 2nd to 3rd positions
    • 5 minute break
    • 5 minutes vibrato
    • 60 minutes material with a 5 minute break thrown in once or twice
    • 10 minutes of sharped and flatted scales (Eb, Bb, Ab, Db, E, F#, G#, etc.)
    • 10 minutes of music theory concentrated study of an area of interest

    Take it easy until you’ve established a flow experience while practicing. Eventually you won’t even notice where the time has gone. :)

    #74123
    Frederick
    Frederick
    Participant

    Perhaps some suggestions on what NOT to do would be helpful, too.

    • Do not begin practice with your violin out of tune. (It must be perfectly in tune with the open strings matching an electronic tuner set perfectly.)
    • Do not settle for any scale note that is not perfectly in tune as you play scales. Your fingers must remember where the exact pitch is for each note.
    • Do not slouch your wrist having the palm of the left hand against the neck. This will haunt you all the days of your life.
    • Do not forget to keep an eye on the bridge to be sure it is not leaning too far forward after lots of tuning.
    • Do not forget that a little pencil lead acts as a lubricant under the strings at the nut and the bridge to help ease the strings across these areas when tuning.
    • Do not become discouraged. Take a break if necessary. Do not give up.
    #74130
    Jerome Linyear
    Jerome Linyear
    Participant

    Thank you all! I will definitely experiment with all of this feedback and come up with a routine that works for me!

     

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