technique question

This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  John Cockman 1 week ago.

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  • #57223
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    When I go from fingering a note to an open string (usually on the higher strings) while using a single bow-stroke I have a tendency to produce a squeak.

    Anyone have any advice on what the problem night be? Could it be that my release is too slow?

    …Note: it is not caused by another finger touching the string.

    #57225
    rodger
    rodger
    Participant

    I can tell you what’s been happening to me Dave.  I had occasion to be plagued with this on the Christmas cantata piece, Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring, which in some arrangements is written in an endless progression of 3 note slurs.  This would always happen when playing the slur of a third finger G on the D string and crossing the bow to the A string.  The higher you go on the string the farther it is to the fingerboard, and it’s easy to be raising the bow off the D string and since you’re holding the string down quite far to get the G note it’s easy to lift your finger as the bow comes off the string and have the string come up and touch the bow as the bow is going up and you get a residual open D note.  It only happens to me on a slur like that because it’s the perfect set up.  The only way to avoid it is to hold that G until the bow is high enough that the string won’t come up & hit it, which is really hard to do if you’re playing fast slurs.  In some cases it’s so loud that I believe I’m actually releasing my finger before the bow is completely off the string, because I’m doing these fast slurs that sound like 3 notes attached to each other with no space in between, and then this loud open string popping sound keeps joining in.

    I cring when I see a fiddle with the set up where the strings are too high off the fingerboard, because it really seems like it would slow a person down in order to keep this from happening.

    #57226
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    With me it tends to happen if I go to the E string…have no idea why…diesn5 happen 3very time and I cam5 figure out what makes it happen.

    #57232

    Angela
    Participant

    Hi Dave,

    It might be what’s called “whistling.”  Here’s a note about it.

    http://www.warchal.com/faq/why_do_violin_e_strings_sometimes_whistle.html

     

    One of my fiddles does that, too.   I use the Kaplan non-whistling e string on it.  It hasn’t completely gone away.  But it is better with that one.

     

     

    #57233
    Steve Srader
    Steve Srader
    Participant

    Interesting , the hardest strings for me are the A and E due to my lack of experience , I have two violins My Dads and my Antonio Giuliani from Kennedy Violins , My dads is softer and easier to play and about half the volume the string action on it is really close , less than a eight on the E string and a eight on the G it does double stops much easier , the string action on the Antonio is somewhat higher a eight of a inch on the E string and 3/16 on the G its twice as loud and harder to do double stops , Maybe someday I will understand , but for now I struggle with A and E

    #57238
    Nancy Parker
    Nancy Parker
    Participant

    Some suggestions from STRINGS Magazine: :  <see below>

     

    What Causes Squeaky, Airy, and Scratchy Sounds?

    Sent from my iPhone

    #57239
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    Thanks all.

    The action on my fiddle is professionally set just high enough to keep the particular strings I use from vibrating against the fingerboard. If I changed to “softer” strings it would need to be raised…so I don’t think action is the problem.

    Roger, the problem seems to occur mostly when lifting my second finger…

    Angela, Good find! I’ll have to check out my hand position when it occurs again…it’s a good possibility this is the problem…maybe some slow motion playing is called for here to check hand position…

    #57249
    rodger
    rodger
    Participant

    Well, your issue could be totally different Dave.  I was just sharing in case you recognized this.  The issue of a rising string hitting a low moving bow is not due to a high action or how high on the fingerboard  you are…this just makes it easier (inevitable) to happen, and I believe it happens to the finger you are most comfortable with, thus faster to release.  For me this is the third finger which is my strongest (or nimblest) of the four, from using an axe, riding a bike etc.

    It’s easy to tell this from a whistle or wolf noise because it’s actually an open string note, sometimes loud & clear & sometimes like a bad, intentional harmonic.

    (I’m learning to copy a response to clipboard, because sometimes the server doesn’t connect on submit & it’s lost)

    #57255
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    Guess I might not have clearly stated the problem Roger…it occurs when I am already playing the string and continuing the bow stroke…there is no way for the string to lift into a bow that is already playing it.

    Nancy, Good article, but I don’t believe it’s a bow problem, or it could happen in more circumstances than just this specific one.

    The sound produced is loud, clear, and at least an octave higher than the open string that should be sounding.

    #57411

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Dave, it might be ringing between your finger and the fingerboard. You may want to lift the finger more quickly.

    #57431
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    After some attention to when it happens I’ve found the problem…actually two.

    Sometimes it is a slow lifting of the finger and sometimes the side of my hand (1st finger) is touching the string. Which problem depends on which position my hand is in at the time.

    It wasn’t too hard to correct. slight change of angle for the “whistle” problem, and quicker lift or change of bowing for the other.

    It’s happening much less often now.

    Thanks to everyone for their input!

    #57468

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Glad you found it!

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