Victorian Hymns

This topic contains 5 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  kjdebolt 3 days ago.

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  • #54339

    Kaeleigh
    Participant

    I’ve got a performance coming up next month for a historical reenactment, and as it is around Thanksgiving, I’d like to play some hymns that at least sound Victorian (although the venue is not super picky about historical authenticity) and are rather upbeat to pair with some dance tunes, but I can’t think of any. Can anyone help?

    #54345
    rodger
    rodger
    Participant

    Kaeleigh do you have the dates for the Victorian period? I’m just not sure exactly when, chronologically you are looking at. Usually in the hymn book it has a date for when the composer lived, so I guess you go by that if you know the time period. Are you talking 1800’s or before that? You are always safe to play old favorites. Just look at how one of Chubby Wise most poplar songs was The Old Rugged Cross, even though it’s style was far from his fiddling style. That would not be a Victorian era song, but it’s a good example of what I’m saying. Look at how Amazing Grace is a plain piece of music, but every singing group & musician uses it sometime. For these hymns use long full bows with good bow weight, if your fiddle responds well to that for the best sound & people will love it.  In the later half of the 1800’s there were some wonderful lively tunes, like On Jordan’s Stormy Banks, etc that should be played moderately fast and sound great.  Most hymns are abused by playing them too slow.  Although for a special mood effect, any piece of music can be done slow.  On most hymns also, the first beat of every measure should be strongly accented to put life into it…it makes all the difference.

    All Hail the Power of Jesus Name was written in the 1700’s and is a perfect example of how the first beat of each measure has to be strongly accented to bring it to life. The James Eliot version, with all the “Crown Him” repeats in the chorus is one of the greatest pieces of music ever written & performed & is great for two fiddles, and when done right is very lively. A Mighty Fortress is another example of ‘power’ in the music when the first beat of the measure is strongly emphasized.

    #54346
    fiddliferous1950
    fiddliferous1950
    Participant

    I’m thinking you might be able to play the Stephen Foster tune “Angeline the Baker”.

    #54361
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    What about In the Sweet Bye & Bye?

    #54366

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Rodger is right, some of the greatest hymns were written in the Victorian era. Also, any of your Civil War tunes will do well.

    Here is a gigantic Victorian-era songbook called “Ryan’s Mammoth Collection.” It has 1050 jigs and reels.

    First, the index, with page numbers:
    http://www.braccio.me/session/RMC.pdf

    Next, the entire songbook on DropBox:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/hf556x4bfig7me3/ryans-mammoth-collection.pdf?dl=0

     

    #54410

    kjdebolt
    Participant

    perhaps “it is well with my soul”?

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