Dixie Hoedown

This is an online fiddle lesson for the bluegrass tune "Dixie Hoedown" by Jesse McReynolds.

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Genre: Bluegrass
Skill Level: Intermediate, Advanced
Key of G

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Video #1: Here is a video of me and myself playing the bluegrass tune "Dixie Hoedown."

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Online Fiddle Lesson

Online Fiddle Lesson

Posted in Advanced, Bluegrass, Intermediate Tagged with:

Best Online Fiddle Lessons Forums Dixie Hoedown

This topic contains 14 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  John Cockman 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #51846

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    This is an online fiddle lesson for the bluegrass tune “Dixie Hoedown” by Jesse McReynolds. This lesson was underwritten by Jessica Hurster. Thank you Jessica!

    See the full post at: Dixie Hoedown

    #51848

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Here’s the original version: Jesse McReynolds playing lead fiddle and Vassar Clements playing the harmony.

    #51852
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    Oh that’s cool!  You got a great companion there…do you two get along ok?   Lol…that’s such a cool-sounding tune…I love that kinda fiddling!  I need some time to try this one as soon as possible!

    #51853
    rodger
    rodger
    Participant

    Cricket, that’s John’s anti-matter twin, and when they get together there’s an explosion of fiddling…I just hope they defied the laws of physics and weren’t annihilated.  That really is a wonderful piece.

    #51861

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Hahaha Rodger. 🙂  That was definitely my evil twin. Now if he could only fiddle like Vassar!

    #51866
    cricket
    cricket
    Participant

    They’re both very, very good fiddlers, no doubt about that.  Vassar might get a little bit nervous if he heard these two guys right now!

    #51982
    John Tait
    John Tait
    Member

    Excellent video on a great tune.

    Nice touch on the twin fiddling.  You changed shirts and cap..!!  ;-))

    Cheers.

    John

    #51992

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Thanks John. I wish I really did have a twin. 🙂 Actually I have a brother (Ben) who is an excellent fiddler and sometimes we play this one together.

    #54580
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    Awesome tune!…another one goes on The List

    #54657
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    thanks Jessica!

    #54678
    rodger
    rodger
    Participant

    Dave, this tune implements rhythm progressions that are excellent training exercises, so when you practice this you are doing a lot more than learning one song.  You are advancing your entire ability to play any thing else.  And it’s a lot more fun than just doing exercises…It’s good to spend some time checking the notes slowly with a tuner to get the intonation in your head good (instead of just trusting how you remember hearing it) so you get the most out of your practice.  If you spend a lot of time learning it just a little bit off, because you’re trusting your ear, then that’s how you’ll learn it, but if you take time to nail down the intonation it will be well worth it.  It can sound really good and still be a little off.  If you’re going to make a big investment of your practice time, you might as well be getting the most out of it.

    #54679
    fiddlewood
    fiddlewood
    Participant

    Seems to me it’s that way with most every tune…

    #54688

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    I prefer tunes over exercies too!

    #54692
    rodger
    rodger
    Participant

    Yes, there is certainly different schools of learning and philosophies how to do it.  Each one has it’s merits and records of achievement to judge it by.  The conventional path most schools & teachers follow to achieve the standard results that are in demand world wide, observe how some exercises fast track the learning experience because they incorporate the building blocks that most tunes are made of.  Exercises can be tiresome & require motivation, & can discourage beginners, but the players that excel use them to get where they are in a time period that they still have most of their life left to perform.  The right exercises can accomplish results that it would take many times the same amount of hours playing various tunes to achieve.  But all this depends on the perspective of what a person wants to do with their music…this universal curriculum will not accomplish a regional/cultural feel to the music.  The way to learn such a style as the Old Time feel of early mountain music can not be learned in the conventional, classical school.  So the purpose & end goal of what a person wants to achieve will determine what school they use to learn.  If I’m working with a young student, I have give them the tools to reach unlimited achievement they can use to go as far as they will ever want.  If a person wants to pick up a fiddle to enjoy passing some time, of course they wouldn’t want to spend time to become a professional.   I’ve met professionals who simply had other things to do with their life than the discipline of playing and would not touch a violin anymore because they would embarrass themselves after having slacked off the discipline it takes to keep the edge.  Most of us don’t want to admit the amount of work we put into it, even if we just want to have a little fun.  Some of the folks here have really put in a lot of time to get where they are.  And it’s certainly worth it…

    #54704

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    “Most of us don’t want to admit the amount of work we put into it, even if we just want to have a little fun.”

    So true, Rodger! And yes, it’s certainly worth it. I really believe that fiddling is one of the most rewarding hobbies one can have. Even if you aren’t a professional, the mind and spirit are benefited by careful practice. When you play music, there’s really no way to lose!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

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