Over the River and Through the Woods

This is an online fiddle lesson for the tune "Over the River and Through the Woods." BluegrassDaddy.com is your best source for Bluegrass, Old Time, Celtic, Gospel, and Country fiddle lessons!

Genre: Holiday
Skill Level: Beginner
Key of A

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Video #1: Here is a video of me performing the fiddle tune "Over the River and Through the Woods."

This is an online fiddle lesson for the tune "Over the River and Through the Woods." BluegrassDaddy.com is your best source for Bluegrass, Old-Time, Celtic, Gospel, and Country fiddle lessons!

This is an online fiddle lesson for the tune "Over the River and Through the Woods." BluegrassDaddy.com is your best source for Bluegrass, Old-Time, Celtic, Gospel, and Country fiddle lessons!

This is an online fiddle lesson for the tune "Over the River and Through the Woods." BluegrassDaddy.com is your best source for Bluegrass, Old-Time, Celtic, Gospel, and Country fiddle lessons!

This is an online fiddle lesson for the tune "Over the River and Through the Woods." BluegrassDaddy.com is your best source for Bluegrass, Old-Time, Celtic, Gospel, and Country fiddle lessons!


"The New-England Boy's Song about Thanksgiving Day", also known as "Over the River and Through the Wood", is a Thanksgiving poem by Lydia Maria Child. Written originally as a poem, it appeared in her Flowers for Children, Volume 2, in 1844. It celebrates her childhood memories of visiting her Grandfather's House. Lydia Maria Child was a novelist, journalist, teacher, and wrote extensively about the need to eliminate slavery.

The poem was eventually set to a tune by an unknown author. The song is sometimes presented with lines about Christmas, rather than Thanksgiving. Although the modern Thanksgiving holiday is not normally associated with snow, New England in the early 19th century was enduring the Little Ice Age, a colder era with earlier winters. (wikipedia.org)


Over the River and Through the Woods

Over the river and through the woods 
To Grandmother's house we go.
The horse knows the way to carry the sleigh 
Through the white and drifted snow.
Over the river and through the woods, 
Oh, how the wind does blow.
It stings the toes and bites the nose 
As over the ground we go.

Over the river and through the woods 
To have a full day of play.
Oh, hear the bells ringing ting-a-ling-ling, 
For it is Thanksgiving Day.
Over the river and through the woods,
Trot fast my dapple gray;
Spring o'er the ground like a hunting hound, 
For this is Thanksgiving Day.

Over the river and through the woods
And straight through the barnyard gate.
It seems that we go so dreadfully slow
It is so hard to wait.
Over the river and through the woods,
Now Grandfather's cap I spy.
Hurrah for fun; the pudding's done; 
Hurrah for the pumpkin pie.
Posted in Beginner, Holiday Tagged with:

Best Online Fiddle Lessons Forums Over the River and Through the Woods

This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 3 years ago.

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  • #6342

    John Cockman
    Keymaster

    Over the River and Through the Woods

    This songs brings back memories of holidays past – going to Grandma’s house (which wasn’t far) to see all the family for Christmas.

    https://bluegrassdaddy.com/over-the-river-and-through-the-woods-fiddle-lesson/

    #6343

    Anonymous

    This comment is from Great Scott.

    There is something about this song and the way John sings it that takes me back to an earlier, innocent era. While listening to this song, I can hear certain lines in the melody that sound like the Christmas carol ‘Jingle Bells’. I am not sure which tune came first – this or Jingle Bells. Perhaps it was the same person who wrote both tunes. Have a listen to it again and I am sure you will hear what I mean. Oh, where have those innocent days gone. This is when I wish I had a time machine.

    • This reply was modified 47 years ago by .
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